GOD SAVE US

Road Kill 2008 Car and crucifix This sculpture depicts a crucified Jesus Christ strapped to the top of an American muscle car. It should remind the viewer of cliché images of a hunter’s freshly killed deer tied to the roof of the car. The mix of American —muscle cars with an iconic religious image— presents the artist’s critical portrait of some people's notions of middle America.

Road Kill

2008

Car and crucifix

This sculpture depicts a crucified Jesus Christ strapped to the top of an American muscle car. It should remind the viewer of cliché images of a hunter’s freshly killed deer tied to the roof of the car. The mix of American —muscle cars with an iconic religious image— presents the artist’s critical portrait of some people's notions of middle America.

The Passion of Christ 2008 Acrylic paint, inket on paper, wood and plastic 6 x 10 x 1-1/2 in  (15,2 x 25,4 x 3,8cm)

The Passion of Christ

2008

Acrylic paint, inket on paper, wood and plastic

6 x 10 x 1-1/2 in  (15,2 x 25,4 x 3,8cm)

Superman Christ 2009 Found object, cloth and resin 84 x 70 x 22 in (213,4 x 177,8 x 55,9cm)

Superman Christ

2009

Found object, cloth and resin

84 x 70 x 22 in (213,4 x 177,8 x 55,9cm)

San Sebastian 2009 Collaboration with Mila Geisler Oil on canvas 24 x 29 (61 x 73,7cm) Saint Sebastian As a child, Sebastian ErraZuriz lived in London while his father was getting his PhD in art. A visit to the National Gallery was a weekend tradition, where his father would always stop in front of the painting of Saint Sebastian and tell Sebastian that this was his personal saint. The artist remembers the image making a strong impression on him, due to the realism of the bleeding wounds and his story: Saint Sebastian was a Christian saint who is said to have been killed during the Roman emperor Diocletian’s persecution of Christians. He is commonly depicted in art and literature tied to a post or tree, shot with arrows for following his beliefs. The story says that after being rescued and healed by Irene of Rome, Saint Sebastian could not resist criticizing the emperor, and as a result was clubbed to death. In memory of the painting, Sebastian ErraZuriz teamed up with his friend, artist Mila Geisler, to create a self-portrait that would represent him ironically as the “poor suffering martyr,” having to put up with the constant criticism of those who disapprove of his own works of religious criticism. The painting comes with a religious bench, candleholder, and a donation box to help fund new religious artwork

San Sebastian

2009

Collaboration with Mila Geisler

Oil on canvas

24 x 29 (61 x 73,7cm)

Saint Sebastian

As a child, Sebastian ErraZuriz lived in London while his father was getting his PhD in art. A visit to the National Gallery was a weekend tradition, where his father would always stop in front of the painting of Saint Sebastian and tell Sebastian that this was his personal saint. The artist remembers the image making a strong impression on him, due to the realism of the bleeding wounds and his story: Saint Sebastian was a Christian saint who is said to have been killed during the Roman emperor Diocletian’s persecution of Christians. He is commonly depicted in art and literature tied to a post or tree, shot with arrows for following his beliefs. The story says that after being rescued and healed by Irene of Rome, Saint Sebastian could not resist criticizing the emperor, and as a result was clubbed to death. In memory of the painting, Sebastian ErraZuriz teamed up with his friend, artist Mila Geisler, to create a self-portrait that would represent him ironically as the “poor suffering martyr,” having to put up with the constant criticism of those who disapprove of his own works of religious criticism. The painting comes with a religious bench, candleholder, and a donation box to help fund new religious artwork

Jesus Paratrooper 2010 Bronze crucifixion, string and umbrella 34 x 36 x 22 in  (91.4 x 91,4 x55,9cm)

Jesus Paratrooper

2010

Bronze crucifixion, string and umbrella

34 x 36 x 22 in  (91.4 x 91,4 x55,9cm)

Cross Bow

 

Gulliver 2009 Found object, roman toy soldiers, metal hooks and rope 46 x 16 x 2 in  (116,8 x 40,6 x 4,7cm) Part of the religious series, the Gulliver sculpture is constructed appropriating a religious figure from the beginning of the century who depicts the death of Jesus Christ. The artist adds a series of miniature ropes to preexisting figure that tie the figure down similar to the illustrations in the children’s book Gulliver’s Travels. With the help of some small Roman figurines that appear to be tying these ropes to the sleeping giant, the sculpture becomes a blurred line between a sacred religious figure with infinite powers and a fantasy character from a fairytale book. The sculpture questions the difference between the fairytale character and the religious one. 

Gulliver

2009

Found object, roman toy soldiers, metal hooks and rope

46 x 16 x 2 in  (116,8 x 40,6 x 4,7cm)

Part of the religious series, the Gulliver sculpture is constructed appropriating a religious figure from the beginning of the century who depicts the death of Jesus Christ. The artist adds a series of miniature ropes to preexisting figure that tie the figure down similar to the illustrations in the children’s book Gulliver’s Travels. With the help of some small Roman figurines that appear to be tying these ropes to the sleeping giant, the sculpture becomes a blurred line between a sacred religious figure with infinite powers and a fantasy character from a fairytale book. The sculpture questions the difference between the fairytale character and the religious one.